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Learning about Creative Strategy and sharing my thoughts along the way.
A Designer's Handbook To Tame The Most Difficult Clients - PSFK →
— 3 months ago with 1 note
Just What Is Experiential Marketing, and How Can It Be Measured? →

"Marketers are spending more on experiential even though return on investment measures are murky."

— 4 months ago
Storytelling, Consumer Attention and Making Money on Media →

"Media doesn’t work if no one is paying attention"

— 4 months ago
The Heart Of Effective Advertising Is A Powerful Insight

The Heart Of Effective Advertising Is A Powerful Insight

Advertising agencies have traditionally split functions into people responsible for client contact (account management), buying (media), and ideas (creative). The importance of consumer insight in the advertising development process has grown over time, and especially since the 1980s when U.S. agencies imported a new discipline from the UK known as “account planning.”

A British advertising researcher by the name of Stanley Pollitt is credited with being one of the originators of account planning. Pollitt felt that consumer information was misused by agencies, and suggested that planners, not representing the client or the agency but the consumer, should work as equal partners with the creative team. Simply put, the job of the planner is to ensure that the work produced by the agency is effective,  digging up consumer insight and refining it so it can fuel creative ideas.

Planners are in a unique position in their jobs because, through their research expertise they glean a greater understanding of the customer and the marketplace and how that can be applied within the agency; thus providing a crucial bridge to create better ideas faster.

I was reminded that nothing is so powerful as a fresh and meaningful insight when I watched the Grand Prix winners in Cannes. From the endearing “Dumb Ways To Die” animated train safety video from Australia, to Dove’s “Real Beauty Sketches”, all had one thing in common – a deep understanding of what motivates their target audience.

The most important job of the account planner is to put together the creative brief. This document gives the creative team all the information they need to develop a campaign. But data is not enough. The brief needs to ignite the creative process. It often doesn’t. Some planners simply transcribe the client’s marketing jargon, convert it to ad talk, and end up with something resembled a grocery shopping list.

A brief that describes the target as “Women 18-34, married, college educated with $45k+HHI, living in A & B counties” might be good to buy media, but it doesn’t help the creatives single out that one living woman and write the ad for her. A good planner needs to conjure up the woman, what her life is like, what she loves and hates, what her hopes and dreams are, how she sees herself, how she wants to be seen. The planner needs to tell the creative team what she currently thinks and what we want her to think. In that, a good planner becomes a muse to the creative team.

A great creative brief inspires, intrigues and provides the fertile soil from which powerful ideas can sprout. It does so with clarity, conciseness, and with a definite point-of-view. The brief should tell the creative team what it wants them to do, what is expected of them. As the creative brief has the power to spark amazing ideas, and ideas are what advertising is all about, it is essential that the CMO and its team immerse themselves in its creation.

It’s hard to imagine today a strong creative team that is not supported by a strong account planner, or a strong “creative” agency that doesn’t have a strong account planning department. In fact, when I evaluate agencies the quality of the planners is as important to me as copywriters and art directors.

Bill Bernbach, the original Mad Man who launched The Creative Revolution in the 1960s with a breed of advertising that had energy, style, wit, and youth, summed up the essence of brand advertising this way:

“At the heart of an effective creative philosophy is the belief that nothing is so powerful as an insight into human nature, what compulsions drive a man, what instincts dominate his action, even though his language so often can camouflage what really motivates him.”

Fifty years later, this still holds true.

— 12 months ago
#Advertising  #BillBernbach Original Creative Strategy Briefs GoodPlanner TheGodFather 
Steve Jobs: 10 Presentation Tactics for Ad Agency New Business

Steve Jobs: 10 Presentation Tactics for Ad Agency New Business

steve jobs presentation tactics for ad agency new business

Steve Jobs has something to teach small to midsize advertising, digital, media and PR agencies about pitching for new business.

Every new business pitch should do three things: inform, educate and entertain.

BusinessWeek.com columnist, Carmine Gallo, is a communications coach for some of the world’s most admired brands. He reveals the techniques that have turned Apple CEO, Steve Jobs, into one of the world’s corporate presenters. There are some helpful nuggets that will add punch to your next agency pitch.

Carmine shares that, “for two full days before a presentation, Jobs will practice the entire presentation, asking for feedback from product managers in the room. For 48 hours, all of his energy is directed at making the presentation the perfect embodiment of Apple’s messages.”

Here is the ‘Readers Digest’ version of his 10 Ways to Sell Your Ideas the Steve Jobs Way:

  1. Plan your presentation with pen and paper. Begin by storyboarding your presentation. Steve Jobs spent his preparation time brainstorming, sketching and white-boarding before he creating his presentation. All of the elements of the story that he wants to tell are thought through, elements are planned and collected before any slides are created.
  2. Create a single sentence description for every service/idea. Concise enough to fit in a 140-character Twitter post. An example, for the introduction of the MacBook Air in January, 2008, Jobs said that is it simply, “The world’s thinnest notebook”.
  3. Create a villain that allows the audience to rally around the hero—you and your product/service.  A ‘villain’ doesn’t necessarily have to be a direct competitor. It can be a problem in need of a solution.
  4. Focus on benefits. This is important for ad agencies to remember. Your audience only cares about how your service will benefit them so lead with benefits rather than agency credentials and capabilities.
  5. Stick to the rule of three for presentations. Almost every Jobs presentation was divided into three parts. You might have twenty points to make, but your audience is only capable of retaining three or four points in short-term memory. Give them too many points and they’ll forget everything you’ve said.
  6. Sell dreams, not your services. Steve Jobs didn’t sell computers. He was passionate about helping to create a better world. That was the promise that he sold. For example, when Jobs introduced the iPod in 2001, he said, “In our own small way we’re going to make the world a better place.” Where most people see the iPod as a music player, Jobs saw it as a tool to enrich people’s lives.
  7. Create visual slides. There were no bullet points in a Steve Jobs’ presentation. Instead he relied on photographs and images. When Steve Jobs unveiled the Macbook Air, Apple’s ultra-thin notebook computer, he showed a slide of the computer fitting inside a manila inter-office envelope. Keep your agency presentation’s that simple.
  8. Make numbers meaningful. Jobs always put large numbers into a context that was relevant to his audience. The bigger the number, the more important it is to find analogies or comparisons that make the data relevant to your audience.
  9. Use plain English. Jobs’s language was remarkably simple. He rarely, if ever, used the jargon that clouds most presentations—terms like ‘best of breed’ or ‘synergy’. His language was simple, clear and direct. So don’t use agency speak when presenting, “integration, proprietary process, etc.”
  10. Practice, practice, practice. Steve Jobs spent hours rehearsing every facet of his presentation. Every slide was written like a piece of poetry, every presentation staged like a theatrical experience. Steve Jobs made a presentation look effortless but that polish came after hours and hours of arduous practice. Agencies often are forced to rely on spontaneity to provide creative energy for a pitch because they have spent all of their time on putting together the presentation and leave little or no time for rehearsal. Most unrehearsed pitches end up falling flat.

Click on the link for a downloadable copy of Carmine Gallo’s, “How to Sell Your Ideas the Steve Jobs Way”

This article was based on Carmine Gallo’s book, The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs. Applying this simple formula can greatly improve any agency’s pitch and help them to stand out from the rest. It is a must read for advertising, digital, media and PR agencies.

— 12 months ago
Presentation (s)
This semester more than any other semester I’ve learned the need to practice a presentation, but no matter how often I practiced on the day of presentation I could feel my throat getting dry, my hands getting sweaty and my brain blank out.

I wish I would have come across this link before the end of the semester: How to Deliver a Talk Without Using Notes.

Good practice can make or break a presentation, or a conversation

Not too long ago I found myself mesmerized by a few speakers at the PSFK conference and wondered how they got to that presentation level. They would walk around the stage with cool, calm energy and finish their talk as if there was no one in the giant room but a good friend.

Along with their presentation they didn’t have bullet points or notes in their hands, I walked away experiencing what they had because they delivered it in such way that made you feel as if you were part of the team.

That’s a good presentation.

What made “How to Deliver a Talk Without Using Notes” so relevant to me was that we often forget the simple rules of engagement. A simple story is more successful than the complicated one

1. Build your talk around a single point.
2. Understand the talk’s structural pieces.
3. Start early
4. Review it.


And its definitely one of the lessons I learned from observing the presenters at the PSFK conference

http://careynieuwhof.com/2012/11/how-to-deliver-a-talk-without-using-notes/

— 1 year ago
Consistency within your brand message.

While in school I have had the opportunity to work under amazing people leading the way in the advertising industry, specifically in digital strategy. Social media channels are the hot thing on the market and getting assigned brands brought a clearer understanding on how brands can be successful and that not all social media channels are the right tools for a brand. 

Some brands create a social page like facebook or on twitter but do nothing with it and then wonder why they have a small market reach. The page has no brand message, people like a page, but lose interest because the brand doesn’t give them fresh material to keep them engaged. One of the many things that I’ve learn in school is that a good customer is when the customer has an ongoing addiction (ie: keeps visiting the page)

A few good examples of brands doing a good job with keeping their customers engaged on Youtube market are and how they do it.

1.     Quicksilver & Roxy :

a.     Voice: International Surf/Skate posts a new video about once a week (Roxy posts slightly more frequently) Posting almost 200 Videos in 2 years.

2.     Ford Models :

a.     Aspirational Fashionista. Publishing multilingual content. Offering a wide range of practical Infotainment.

3.     University of Phoenix Online

a.     On YouTube, University of Phoenix has hundreds of video testimonials, reviews, mini-documentaries and webisodes. By being the first in their category to create a sponsored channel on YouTube, University of Phoenix Online automatically falls at the top of any search on YouTube for online school

4.     Home Depot

a.     Home Depot knows that bringing value to consumers in the form of free education content does 3 important things: Establishes home depot as a trusted expert. Promotes the products and tools. Humanizes a faceless corporation

putting the user 1st is the most important and it proves to be the best user experience because it engages them and it also creates: Useful, Usable & Delightful information.

"It’s looking further than just your website or updating your Twitter feed, and looking as well at all of the digital channels which you want to engage with your audience, and most of all ensuring that there is consistency within your brand message."

— 1 year ago
Fun fact: Only 9% of the population holds a degree higher then a B.A. Be part of the fun fact.

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dHIyTjZDdl9uQnVpSDhTUXVTQ2tuQ1E6MQ

I created this survey as part of class. While sending it out to friends I noticed that majority of the people I thought of or reached out to were women. This blew my mind and while I may know a lot more women achieving this degree I know that there are plenty of men who are also working towards the same goal, but why do I only know so few?


As part of the research I also found out that only 9% of the population holds a degree higher then a B.A. I knew that going into graduate school that there was small percentage but seeing the number stirred some emotions of curiosity and pride. 

What I find more interesting is the people who are part of this small percentage: What drives them? Why the next step? What does their background look like? What are they trying to achieve? Where do these people live? Where do they plan to go with this degree?

Given the chance I would talk to all of the people in this small percent because a survey can only get you so far with such few answers, but talking to them I would have a large pool of information that is going untapped.

I’ve heard this many times before a B.A in the eyes of the corporate world is like holding a high school degree. Is a graduate school the new wave of education?

— 1 year ago with 1 note
#Survey  #people  #population  #men  #women  #grad  #graduate school  #school  #funfact  #fact  #research  #education 
I’ve always wondered why we see just a handful of women in math and science when women in fact they are good at problem solving. Growing up my older brother got all of the attention and looking back I remember my parents just boasting with pride when he solved a simple problem but didn’t really pay any mind when I solved mind challenging problems at my age, which them lead me to stop trying at home. 
In High school I excelled in math and was at the top of my classes until this kid who transferred from a private school knocked me out of my glory. He was mean and would say rude things about my ability to solve problems, which made me hide and then I lost my interest in what I loved, ugh, that kid.
What we go through as we develop is what we learned growing up. In a research study in NewsWeek Magazine this thought is re-enforced   “How we perceive children—sociable or remote, physically bold or reticent—shapes how we treat them and therefore what experiences we give them. Since life leaves footprints on the very structure and function of the brain, these various experiences produce sex differences in adult behavior and brains—the result not of innate and inborn nature but of nurture…Kids rise or fall according to what we believe about them,”
With years of cultural doubt in women and cultural differences that women should stay at home and take care of the family and men go out to fight the battle. We have moved far from those years but those voices still echo in some heads and with this story told with numbers can remove the “unnecessary text” and really pull forward the information that matters where women stand in the field of Math and Science and where they can be 10-20 years from now.
Source:
http://www.thedailybeast.com/newsweek/2009/09/02/pink-brain-blue-brain.html
http://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=4-__OV0FG7MC&oi=fnd&pg=PR6&dq=women+in+science+and+math&ots=bcOcdh-2EP&sig=N7bk8kigMWWxTlzCD3kDZ0tgytw#v=onepage&q=women%20in%20science%20and%20math&f=false

I’ve always wondered why we see just a handful of women in math and science when women in fact they are good at problem solving. Growing up my older brother got all of the attention and looking back I remember my parents just boasting with pride when he solved a simple problem but didn’t really pay any mind when I solved mind challenging problems at my age, which them lead me to stop trying at home. 

In High school I excelled in math and was at the top of my classes until this kid who transferred from a private school knocked me out of my glory. He was mean and would say rude things about my ability to solve problems, which made me hide and then I lost my interest in what I loved, ugh, that kid.

What we go through as we develop is what we learned growing up. In a research study in NewsWeek Magazine this thought is re-enforced   “How we perceive children—sociable or remote, physically bold or reticent—shapes how we treat them and therefore what experiences we give them. Since life leaves footprints on the very structure and function of the brain, these various experiences produce sex differences in adult behavior and brains—the result not of innate and inborn nature but of nurture…Kids rise or fall according to what we believe about them,”

With years of cultural doubt in women and cultural differences that women should stay at home and take care of the family and men go out to fight the battle. We have moved far from those years but those voices still echo in some heads and with this story told with numbers can remove the “unnecessary text” and really pull forward the information that matters where women stand in the field of Math and Science and where they can be 10-20 years from now.

Source:

http://www.thedailybeast.com/newsweek/2009/09/02/pink-brain-blue-brain.html

http://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=4-__OV0FG7MC&oi=fnd&pg=PR6&dq=women+in+science+and+math&ots=bcOcdh-2EP&sig=N7bk8kigMWWxTlzCD3kDZ0tgytw#v=onepage&q=women%20in%20science%20and%20math&f=false

— 1 year ago